• Welcome to the Resident Evil Community Forum!

    We're a group of fans who are passionate about the Resident Evil series and video gaming.

    Register Log in

Resident Evil: Welcome to Racoon City

Hardware

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2020
Messages
329
Reaction score
264
Points
3,553
Actually you can. You could do a lot more with 33 mln 2002 money than with 25 mln 2020 money, very obviously, especially if we consider Covid-related expenses in that miserable budget. 2002 movie looks way more expensive than WTRC because in fact it was way more expensive :) And overuse of CGI from some cheap VFX house makes any movie look cheap.
Dude, that's what I said - the 2002 movie is more expensive. Even though the two processes cannot really be compared beyond a certain point. In 2002, they had to use CG sparingly and rely more on practical effects (the Uber-Licker actually existed as both an animatronic and a puppet\suit). In 2020, they used CG for stuff that really didn't need it and had to cut on the practical effects (aside from the zombies, pretty much everything else is CG - Lisa is played by an actress, but that's more a matter of costume design than make-up and she's not the same creature from the games - no tentacles and disfigured face glimpsed underneath the skin mask). They are really the opposite, the Ying and the Yang. Some people online speculated WTRC was only made so that Constantin could retain the rights to the franchise (something similar happened to the Hellraiser movies) - I wouldn't be surprised if it will turn out to be true and the real goal was to get the Netflix deal for the RE series (which will probably be terrible too).
 

Gun Powder B

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2021
Messages
217
Reaction score
135
Points
2,288
Resident Evil 2002 had double the budget Welcome to Raccoon City had, discounting Covid expenses of course.


Not sure they could have saved this film with a more proportional budget but it probably couldn't have hurt...lol
 

Maverick1

Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2022
Messages
8
Reaction score
7
Points
157
Age
36
Dude, that's what I said - the 2002 movie is more expensive. Even though the two processes cannot really be compared beyond a certain point. In 2002, they had to use CG sparingly and rely more on practical effects (the Uber-Licker actually existed as both an animatronic and a puppet\suit). In 2020, they used CG for stuff that really didn't need it and had to cut on the practical effects (aside from the zombies, pretty much everything else is CG - Lisa is played by an actress, but that's more a matter of costume design than make-up and she's not the same creature from the games - no tentacles and disfigured face glimpsed underneath the skin mask).
I'd say overuse of cheap CGI and underuse of practical effects is a common problem in the industry these days, so many films don't look like films now, more like animated features with actors' close-ups inserted here and there.
Some people online speculated WTRC was only made so that Constantin could retain the rights to the franchise (something similar happened to the Hellraiser movies) - I wouldn't be surprised if it will turn out to be true and the real goal was to get the Netflix deal for the RE series (which will probably be terrible too).
I don't think it's true, they would've done Greg Russo's version if it was an attempt to quickly make a movie to retain the rights. And WTRC will look like a masterpiece compared to what they are doing with Netflix series. Constantin just doesn't care about quality, never did, they want a big profit, but they don't want to invest much.
 

Ark2000

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2018
Messages
101
Reaction score
60
Points
3,978
I don't think it's true, they would've done Greg Russo's version if it was an attempt to quickly make a movie to retain the rights. And WTRC will look like a masterpiece compared to what they are doing with Netflix series. Constantin just doesn't care about quality, never did, they want a big profit, but they don't want to invest much.
If that leaked script for first episode is anything to go by, i will say it right here, despite its problems, WTRC will still be better Resident Evil adaptation than Netflix series. And it's just a theory i have, but if rumors about Russo's script were true, like how it was going to be more like Resident Evil 7, i can see see why Constantin would go with different version. Maybe they thought how more people would be interested in movie based on Raccoon City storylines from original games (or remakes), instead of one based on more recent game. Or maybe Russo's script just wasn't good, which is another big possibility.
 

Hardware

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2020
Messages
329
Reaction score
264
Points
3,553
Resident Evil 2002 had double the budget Welcome to Raccoon City had, discounting Covid expenses of course.


Not sure they could have saved this film with a more proportional budget but it probably couldn't have hurt...lol
What I am trying to explain here is that a movie made 20 years ago cannot be compared to what it is done now in terms of costs, because it's all quite different now. Resident Evil 2002 was shot on 35mm, WTRC was shot digitally (and, no, this is not the reason why it looks cheap - every movie\series you watch these days, including dramas, is shot with digital cameras - save for a little minority): this element alone makes a world of difference because filmstock had specific costs which you don't find anymore. One could argue that high-end digital cinema cameras cost a lot in data management and storage, but the costs of buying, processing, transferring to tape for editing, negative cutting, scanning for VFX, color grading, printing etc. that came with shooting film are unmatched. And this is without taking into account all the other aspects of movie production.

Just converting the budgets according to inflation doesn't work because we are talking about an industry that was reshaped by technological innovation: it's the same as flatly comparing the costs and profits of a cotton mill before and after the Second Industrial Revolution.

We can all agree that WTRC cost less than 2002 RE and it shows. How much less it actually cost in practical terms, that's hard to tell. Especially because we don't actually know the actual budgets these movies had - what production companies and studios declare is usually an inflated amount. Sometimes it is so because they factor in everything they spent on the movie (including hiring writers who wrote drafts that were never used, concept artworks with similar fates, and so on). Sometimes it's just "creative accounting". Sometimes it's both.
 

Bran

Independent Film Director
Joined
Sep 12, 2015
Messages
131
Reaction score
114
Points
9,955
Age
37
If that leaked script for first episode is anything to go by, i will say it right here, despite its problems, WTRC will still be better Resident Evil adaptation than Netflix series. And it's just a theory i have, but if rumors about Russo's script were true, like how it was going to be more like Resident Evil 7, i can see see why Constantin would go with different version. Maybe they thought how more people would be interested in movie based on Raccoon City storylines from original games (or remakes), instead of one based on more recent game. Or maybe Russo's script just wasn't good, which is another big possibility.
It was never confirmed what the plot of Russo's script was. His interviews only stated that he modeled the tone from Resident Evil 7, the sense of fear and dread. It never stated he was adapting 7 itself as a movie.
 

Gun Powder B

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2021
Messages
217
Reaction score
135
Points
2,288
Just converting the budgets according to inflation doesn't work because we are talking about an industry that was reshaped by technological innovation: it's the same as flatly comparing the costs and profits of a cotton mill before and after the Second Industrial Revolution.

The Terminator is vastly superior to ANY Resident Evil movie and it's about the same timespan apart from RE 2002 than WTRC and RE 2002 and it has VERY barebones special effects.

I don't believe it's a relevant argument in this medium. It's just the sign of the times, films just flat out suck nowadays.
 

Hardware

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2020
Messages
329
Reaction score
264
Points
3,553
The Terminator is vastly superior to ANY Resident Evil movie and it's about the same timespan apart from RE 2002 than WTRC and RE 2002 and it has VERY barebones special effects.

I don't believe it's a relevant argument in this medium. It's just the sign of the times, films just flat out suck nowadays.
The Terminator is a better movie because it has a better story and is more cleverly put together - if we were to judge it from a mere technical standpoint, it would be wiped away by 2002 Resident Evil. Young people nowadays would laugh at the stop-motion endoskeleton or the unconvincing, rubbery Arnold mannequin when the character self-repairs in front of a mirror.

Film technology didn't drastically change from 1984 to 2002. Aside from the fact movies began being edited on AVID digital systems (making creative editing faster and more open-ended), slight increases in film speed, and digital sound, movies made in the 90s were mostly made the same way as they were in the 80s. The first movie that was color graded in a digital suite from top to bottom was "Brother, where are thou?" in 2000 but the process remained a luxury very few could afford in the next years. Despite its pristine look, 2002 Resident Evil was still graded photochemically and, even though fact CG was introduced more than a decade earlier, the amount of actual CG shot is minimal because it was still highly expensive in those days.

Things really began to change when the original Red One (uber-flawed camera if you ask me) was introduced in 2008-ish, which increased the number of digitally-captured movies and it did so with relatively-inexpensive tapeless recording and a user-friendly post-production workflow. But digital back then was still the alternative. Then Arri introduced the original Alexa camera in 2010, and all of a sudden filmstock lost its number one spot and was quickly relegated to Quentin Tarantino and Christopher Nolan's movie. At the same time, computer technology became cheaper (making owning a CG-capable workstation a realistic proposition for many) and Digital VFX vendors began appearing everywhere, while less than 10 years earlier there were only about a dozen facilities in the world that could offer that kind of service.
 
Last edited:

Hardware

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 28, 2020
Messages
329
Reaction score
264
Points
3,553
It was never confirmed what the plot of Russo's script was. His interviews only stated that he modeled the tone from Resident Evil 7, the sense of fear and dread. It never stated he was adapting 7 itself as a movie.
I am one of the many who was misled into thinking he actually was about to adapt 7 - it seemed very obvious to me at that time because the game was a success. Whether or not it was in the intentions, thank goodness they never did go in that direction. But I cannot honestly see anyone (not even Constantin) doing something like that: for movie-going audiences (who only partially overlap with the gaming crowd), RE is about people with big guns shooting zombies and monsters while doing ridiculous stunts. Making a clone of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre with fungal monsters would've definitely disoriented people at this stage. Luckily for them, RE2make became a success as well, so they managed to roll in WTRC, which, despite it trying to be a horror movie, is still about people shooting guns at zombies and monsters.
 

Bran

Independent Film Director
Joined
Sep 12, 2015
Messages
131
Reaction score
114
Points
9,955
Age
37
I am one of the many who was misled into thinking he actually was about to adapt 7 - it seemed very obvious to me at that time because the game was a success. Whether or not it was in the intentions, thank goodness they never did go in that direction. But I cannot honestly see anyone (not even Constantin) doing something like that: for movie-going audiences (who only partially overlap with the gaming crowd), RE is about people with big guns shooting zombies and monsters while doing ridiculous stunts. Making a clone of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre with fungal monsters would've definitely disoriented people at this stage. Luckily for them, RE2make became a success as well, so they managed to roll in WTRC, which, despite it trying to be a horror movie, is still about people shooting guns at zombies and monsters.

Another thing that makes a difference is director... JAMES CAMERON directed The Terminator. (I know you know this, Hardware... it's more for others posting on here). James Cameron worked under Roger Corman, and had a background in matte paintings and cheap effects. He entered the film industry learning ways to stretch a budget.

@Hardware is correct that by today's standards, people mock the special effects of The Terminator. They are clearly dated. I love them for being practical. But I can't deny that they haven't held up today.

The Terminator is also a smaller film in scale. It has a small cast of characters, and much of its effects are done cheap. It just looks really good because of Cameron's direction and background.
 

Gun Powder B

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2021
Messages
217
Reaction score
135
Points
2,288
I think everyone knows Jim directed Terminator :cautious:

And who needs CGI when you have scenes like this:

You must be registered for see medias

You must be registered for see medias

How about, you know, focus on a good story and actually, you know, DIRECTING instead of going the loser route of George Lucas, who obsessed over special effects which ruined his career. George is like the biggest warning in film history, and directors by and large I think made it a point to focus more on being more realistic than CGI.
 

Bran

Independent Film Director
Joined
Sep 12, 2015
Messages
131
Reaction score
114
Points
9,955
Age
37
I think everyone knows Jim directed Terminator :cautious:

And who needs CGI when you have scenes like this:

You must be registered for see medias

You must be registered for see medias

How about, you know, focus on a good story and actually, you know, DIRECTING instead of going the loser route of George Lucas, who obsessed over special effects which ruined his career. George is like the biggest warning in film history, and directors by and large I think made it a point to focus more on being more realistic than CGI.
Because doing things practical runs the risk of higher insurance, many takes if the effects don't go off the way you want, not to mention it costs thousands if not tens of thousands of dollars per day on set. The quicker you get through filming the better. That's why many Productions have switched to digital characters, effects, and locations.

The technology used in The Mandalorian is going to be rolled out on more Productions as the years go on.

It's just how the industry is moving.

If you want an 80's style movie, well... you're gonna have to make them yourself and find the financing.
 

Ark2000

Well-Known Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2018
Messages
101
Reaction score
60
Points
3,978
Maverick already went into details about earlier draft of the script for WTRC;


And it looks like there were even more differences in even earlier drafts;


Some of the rumors i heard, and i'm sure other fans here also did, is how the movie almost had Hunter and Mr X, before they were cut out of the script. I guess based on this concept art, this could be true.
 

Maverick1

Member
Joined
Jan 3, 2022
Messages
8
Reaction score
7
Points
157
Age
36

Some of the rumors i heard, and i'm sure other fans here also did, is how the movie almost had Hunter and Mr X, before they were cut out of the script. I guess based on this concept art, this could be true.
Interesting, but most likely they are related to Greg Russo's version, there were no other creatures in early Roberts' draft.
 
Top